Water Quality Testing

We offer all the tests to needed to satisfy any lender's requirements and inform you of any threats to your health. Different lenders have different criteria for well water testing so always consult with your lender. We’ve combined the most common tests required by lenders for convenience and value.

We are certified by the Maryland Department of the Environment to collect water samples and all tests are performed in a state accredited laboratory.

MDE Certified
  • Coliform bacteria
  • Nitrates
  • Sand, turbidity
  • Nitrites
  • Lead
  • Iron
  • Copper
  • Arsenic
  • Radium
  • Fluoride
  • And more

Some tests take more time in the lab than others so you’ll want to have this done with your home inspection to get the results back in a timely way. We can offer expedited testing but that can be very expensive.

Schedule a test

Private Drinking Water Wells

If your family gets drinking water from a private well, do you know if your water is safe to drink? What health risks could you and your family face? Where can you go for help or advice?

Well water testing

EPA regulates public water systems; it does not have the authority to regulate private drinking water wells. Approximately 15 percent of Americans rely on their own private drinking water supplies, and these supplies are not subject to EPA standards, although some state and local governments do set rules to protect users of these wells. Unlike public drinking water systems serving many people, they do not have experts regularly checking the water’s source and its quality before it is sent to the tap. These households must take special precautions to ensure the protection and maintenance of their drinking water supplies.

The EPA recommends that you test water every year for total coliform bacteria, nitrates, total dissolved solids and pH levels, especially if you have a new well, or have replaced or repaired pipes, pumps or the well casing. Do you expect to have a new baby in the household? Test for nitrate in the early months of a pregnancy, before bringing an infant home, and again during the first six months of the baby’s life. It is best to test for nitrate during the spring or summer following a rainy period. Do you have taste, odor and staining issues? Test for sulfate, chloride, iron, manganese, hardness and corrosion, and every three years. If you suspect other contaminants, test for these also. Have you had a chemical or fuel spill or leak near your water supply? Test your well for chemical contaminants, such as volatile organic compounds. Tests can be expensive; limit them to possible problems specific to your situation. Local experts can tell you about possible impurities in your area. Is someone in your household pregnant or nursing an infant? Are there unexplained illnesses in your family? Do you notice a change in water taste, odor, color or clarity? You may need to test more than once a year.

Proper well construction and continued maintenance are keys to the safety of your water supply. Your state water-well contractor licensing agency, local health department, or local water system professional can provide information on well construction.

Many homeowners tend to forget the value of good maintenance until problems reach crisis levels. That can be expensive. It’s better to maintain your well, find problems early, and correct them to protect your well’s performance. Keep up-to-date records of well installation and repairs plus pumping and water tests. Such records can help spot changes and possible problems with your water system. If you have problems, ask a local expert to check your well construction and maintenance records. He or she can see if your system is okay or needs work.

Protect your own well area. Be careful about storage and disposal of household and lawn care chemicals and wastes. Good farmers and gardeners minimize the use of fertilizers and pesticides. Take steps to reduce erosion and prevent surface water runoff. Regularly check underground storage tanks that hold home heating oil, diesel, or gasoline. Make sure your well is protected from the wastes of livestock, pets, and wildlife.

EPA: Drinking Water From Private Wells